Filatures

filatures

The project aims at robotically printing a facade screen made out of a cellulose-based composite that promotes mycelium growth in specifically determined areas. The design derives from a simplified point cloud turned into a linear mesh that is later interpreted by the robot in the form of ‘curly’ geometries.

petri2

Careful observation of different mycelium growth patterns leads to the design of a new type of filamentous host in which mycelium can proliferate along the geometric interstices and orifices of the material. This triggers a novel morphological interaction between ‘nature’ and ‘artifice’ that is simultaneously bio-mimetic and bio-receptive.

unspecified-6

A small-scale 3D printed bio-scaffold is designed for an incubator growth to host the progressive cell division of mycelium from its origins as a seed to a mature evolved root system. The shape of the bio-scaffold results from the careful observation of mycelium growth and its multiple morphological transformations.

unspecified-7

The design of a Bio-recepive facade screen evolves from an iterative design and manufacturing process in which data is generated both from scanning growth systems (in nature), as well as computationally – driven in-lab simulations. The resulting filamentous geometry creates an intricate ‘veil’ for a pavilion design. It is in parts colonised by mycelium as a means to strengthen and bind different surface areas of the facade. Careful observation of different mycelium growth pattern leads to the design of a new type of filamentous host in which mycelium can proliferate along the geometric interstices and orifices of the material. This triggers a novel morphological interaction between ‘nature’ and ‘artifice’ that is simultaneously bio-mimetic and bio-receptive.